Viewsy – instore offline traffic analytics

Viewsy – instore offline traffic analytics

E-commerce KPI comparison Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest traffic

E-commerce KPI comparison Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest traffic (Beautiful and useful infographic)

Some main points:

  • Facebook drives 86% of social retail sales, Pinterest 11%, Twitter 3%
  • Visitors to ecommerce sites coming from Facebook view an average of 7 pgs / session vs. 4.1 Pinterest, 2.7 Twitter
  • Facebook traffic converts at 2.6% for ecommerce sites vs. 1.1% Twitter, 0.9% Pinterest
  • Ecommerce AOV from Pinterest referrals is $169 vs. $95 Facebook, $71 Twitter 
  • Revenue/visitor averages $2.50 for Facebook traffic, $1.6 for Pinterest, $0.80 for Twitter

 

99 facts & stats about the future of business

99 facts & stats about the future of business

Some examples:

  • The average number of sources of content consumed by a shopper in a purchase doubled from 2010 to 2011 going from 5 to 10 pieces of content consumed.
  • Gen Y will form 75% of the workforce by 2025 and are actively shaping corporate culture and expectations. Only 11% define having a lot of money as a definition of success.
  • The global rate of extreme poverty fell to 20.6 percent, less than half the 1990 rate of 43.1 percent

 

Facebook marketing toolkit and ecosystem

Facebook marketing toolkit and ecosystem
Facebook marketing toolkit and ecosystem

(click to enlarge)

Opt-in’s: email is replaced by social media

Opt-in’s: email is replaced by social media

Partnering with TripAdvisor brings relevance and reliability to linked cardmembers’ customer reviews on the TripAdvisor site.

The majority of cardmembers who have linked their cards to their social media profiles previously opted out of email.

Currently trialling ‘Tweet to Buy’.

 

Contemplating strategy after reading about Napoleon Bonaparte

I found this great article about Napoleon Bonaparte. I am a big fan of him.

Rapidity of movements.
“The strength of an army,
like the power in mechanics,
is estimated by multiplying
the mass by the rapidity …
Press on !” – Napoleon Bonaparte

Five principles guiding the development of his plans.

Before every campaign Napoleon considered all possible options. The Emperor wrote, “There is no man more pusillanimous than I when I am planning a campaign. I purposely exaggerate all the dangers and all the calamities that the circumstances make possible. I am in a thoroughly painful state of agitation. This does not keep me from looking quite serene in front of my entourage; I am like an unmarried girl laboring with child.”

In the months and weeks before operations actually commenced he would begin to collect information. In addition to reading an enormous number and variety of books bearing on the enemy and the theater of war, he studied the volumes of intelligence reports forwarded by the agents that he had scattered throughout Europe. He would pursue works of political history, accounts of the state of roads and bridges, reports on the politicians and generals, and even studied patterns of food stockpiling and distribution.

  1. The primary objective is the destruction of the enemy ‘ s armies
    or the main army. That done, any remaining problems could be
    easily solved. If the enemy did not want to risk a battle, they might be forced
    to do so by a threat to their capital city.
  2. All forces must concentrate on the task of attaining the objective.
  3. Operations must be designed to surprise and confuse the enemy.
    Always, he sought to seize and keep the initiative, to impose his
    will on the enemy.
  4. Every effort must be made to render the enemy helpless through
    the severance of his lines of supply, communications, and retreat.
    His favorite movement was to envelop one of the enemy’s army’s
    flanks and threaten its rear and communications, forcing it either
    to retire hurriedly or to turn and fight at a disadvantage.
  5. The security of French forces must be guarded to prevent surprise.

 

Social Login, E-Commerce and Conversion Rates

Social Login, E-Commerce and Conversion Rates

How Social Login Effects Ecommerce (Monetate Infographic)

  • 65% of all internet adults have an account  with one or more social networks
  • 40% percent of consumer prefer social login over creating a guest account
  • 100-300% increase in Time On Site from consumers who logged in with a Social Login instead of a ‘normal’ account
  • Almost 300% increase in Pageviews from consumers who logged in with a Social Login instead of a ‘normal’ account

Social Login Trends Across the Web for Q3 2013 (Janrain Infographic)

  • Facebook rules and Google+ is speeding up

UX reasons to use Social Login

  • user adoption
  • user friendly (they don’t have to complete a profile, it saves them time)
  • photo integration
  • e-mail contact details
  • spam reduction
  • invite friends or share with friends
  • 77% of Social Network users think websites should offer social login

Source, source2, Source3

Business reasons to use Social Login

  • Increase conversion rates (sign-ups as sales)
  • Social data into CRM
  • Personalization and onsite targeting
  • Opening up social commerce possibilities
  • Targeting social media ads
  • Several resources mention sign-up increase conversion rates between 20-70%

Source

 Contrary opinions

Other (side) resources