Nah… No scientific significant evidence… Just a hunch based on my own wall/timeline. Male friends are fleeing en mass… to Whatsapp… What’s your experience?

Facebook reviews

Magazine brands with the most Likes are obviously doing something right and other publishers could learn from their strategies. Digital think tank L2 recently released a survey withvarious statistics about digital presence, including a list of the top 10 magazine brands (by numbers of fans) on Facebook. Unsurprisingly, the mags in the top spots seem to employ similar tactics to drive their fan numbers up.

 

It’s important to remember that while having a lot of Likes has become a popularity barometer for media brands, millions of Facebook fans doesn’t necessarily translate toengagement and revenue. It does, however, mean that you’ve built a brand that translates well to social media. We took a look at the five most-Liked magazines on Facebook — PlayboyVoguePeopleCosmopolitan and Seventeen — and found some common themes in their strategies.

As more and more brands are opening up shop on their Facebook pages it is becoming increasingly important to find ways to reward customers for purchasing and sharing.  As a result, we are seeing an influx of special offers like group deals and flash sales hitting Facebook commerce stores.  I had the opportunity to speak with several leaders in F-commerce—SortPriceZibaba, andWildFire—to find out more about how these deals work, why they’re great for creating a buzz, and how they play into the future of F-commerce.

Who I talked to…

Before getting into the nitty-gritty of deals on Facebook, I’ll quickly give a little bit of background on the three companies that I spoke with.  The CEO and co-founder of SortPrice, Doron Simovitch, was the first person I heard from.  SortPrice offers a Facebook store application that makes it easy for brands to create stores on their Facebook pages.  SortPrice does not currently give users the option to offer group deals, but they are a forerunner in Facebook Flash Sales.

Michael Katz, the VP of Business Development at Zibaba also provided input.  Zibaba is one of the first online storefront apps to offer users the ability to create group deals and offers.  They also offer a unique affiliate program that lets outsiders promote a brand’s Facebook shop.

Finally, I heard from the CEO of Wildfire, an application that specializes in group deals on Facebook.  Read on to find out what this triad had to say.

As more and more brands are opening up shop on their Facebook pages it is becoming increasingly important to find ways to reward customers for purchasing and sharing.  As a result, we are seeing an influx of special offers like group deals and flash sales hitting Facebook commerce stores.  I had the opportunity to speak with several leaders in F-commerce—SortPriceZibaba, andWildFire—to find out more about how these deals work, why they’re great for creating a buzz, and how they play into the future of F-commerce.

Who I talked to…

Before getting into the nitty-gritty of deals on Facebook, I’ll quickly give a little bit of background on the three companies that I spoke with.  The CEO and co-founder of SortPrice, Doron Simovitch, was the first person I heard from.  SortPrice offers a Facebook store application that makes it easy for brands to create stores on their Facebook pages.  SortPrice does not currently give users the option to offer group deals, but they are a forerunner in Facebook Flash Sales.

Michael Katz, the VP of Business Development at Zibaba also provided input.  Zibaba is one of the first online storefront apps to offer users the ability to create group deals and offers.  They also offer a unique affiliate program that lets outsiders promote a brand’s Facebook shop.

Finally, I heard from the CEO of Wildfire, an application that specializes in group deals on Facebook.  Read on to find out what this triad had to say.

 

How do Facebook flash sales work?

 

 

Doron Simovitch of SortPrice explained how flash sales work on Facebook.  Basically, a flash sale is a timed sale that offers a deal for users for a very specific window of time.  When a user sets up a flash sale via SortPrice’s storefront app, “the flash sale goes live immediately on the merchant’s Facebook store, with a product image and description and a countdown clock alerting shoppers how long they have to take advantage of … fans can visit the merchant’s Facebook store to take advantage of it, with the transaction being completed on the merchant’s actual website.  Fans also have the ability to like a flash sale, comment on it, and/or share it with other Facebook friends, giving it a genuine shopping feel.”

A webpage owner has seemingly unlimited choice in products that slice and dice information about those who visit his or her page. Real timePersonalWith a heat map? No problem. Facebook page managers, however, don’t have it as easy.

The Google Analytics of Facebook is called “Insights,” and for someone who is dealing with the typical Facebook fan page, it’s a sufficient meat-and-potatoes analysis tool. PageLever, a Y Combinator startup that launched Wednesday, is a more elaborate version of Insights for brands that want to get a bit deeper in their analysis — a group of users that so far includes YouTube, Microsoft, Mint and Kayak.

PageLever shows impressions (any time a story loads in a browser, whether on your page or not) for any date range, not just month or week. It separates unique impressions from repeat impressions so that you can see your true reach, and it shows when and where fans “unliked” your page. You can also look at what type of content — photos, video, text or flash — your audience responds to best.

Most of the data, says co-founder Jeff Widman, comes from Insights’ API but is not necessarily visible within the Insights dashboard. Services like Buddy Media and Webtrends already accomplish similar feats, though Widman says that PageLever accesses more data.

More data theoretically gives page managers a leg up in

Facebook’s somewhat frustrating version of the SEO game.

“Essentially it helps find more eyeballs for your content,” Widman says